Ev trip planner washington university pediatrics

• air density: this varies with temperature and altitude. The same level-road trip at a higher altitude takes less energy than at sea level since the air is thinner. Similarly, the same trip (without air conditioning or heating) takes less energy when it is hotter since the air is thinner. We determine altitude over the route using the mapquest database and use your input for temperature.

Setting the parameters for your trip is critical to getting an accurate estimate of the energy that will be consumed. American university student jobs the most important setting is your "speed factor", which is how much faster or slower than the prevailing speed (as estimated by google maps at the time of planning the route) you are going on average. Unfortunately, you can drive in different patterns and have the same average speed while consuming different amounts of energy.

While these errors don’t tend to be very large for long trips, the closer to "cruise control" you are at the average speed on long segments the closer the estimate will be. Also fill in payload, outside and cabin temperatures and your correct car model – these can make a significant difference. Interpreting results

EVTripPlanner has been used to plan over 50,000 routes for thousands of EV drivers. Many drivers report that evtripplanner predictions are very accurate – more than any other tool available. But you can’t count on it being within let’s say, 5%, all the time. You can hit unexpected traffic, weather conditions (especially headwinds) or have to make a last minute detour – so you should always have some margin for safety and a "plan B" for where you would charge for any trip that is estimated to use more than about 80% of the available energy.

rated miles: this is how tesla reports remaining range (rather than kwh). In order to translate the kwh used by evtripplanner’s model to tesla (or other EV) rated miles, we need to use some conversion factor. Unfortunately, tesla does not publish this number and with recent software releases it may not even be the same all the time. Tesla’s trip meter also doesn’t measure *all* energy used (if you add up energy/miles used plus rated miles remaining, it doesn’t add up to the miles you started with after the last charge). We have made our best estimate, and it seems to correlate pretty well.

We are always interested in your feedback – good and bad, feature requests and defect reports. When providing feedback on route accuracy, please provide your route ID (after the ? In the URL) and information about your drive that might be relevant. Send to comments@evtripplanner.Com

EVTripPlanner is maintained by ben hannel (with a little help from the rest of the family). Ben is 16 now and was 15 when he started working on evtripplanner. American public university jobs he will be applying for college in the fall. If you like and use evtripplanner, consider making a donation to his college fund with the DONATE button.

• air density: this varies with temperature and altitude. The same level-road trip at a higher altitude takes less energy than at sea level since the air is thinner. Similarly, the same trip (without air conditioning or heating) takes less energy when it is hotter since the air is thinner. We determine altitude over the route using the mapquest database and use your input for temperature.

Setting the parameters for your trip is critical to getting an accurate estimate of the energy that will be consumed. The most important setting is your "speed factor", which is how much faster or slower than the prevailing speed (as estimated by google maps at the time of planning the route) you are going on average. Unfortunately, you can drive in different patterns and have the same average speed while consuming different amounts of energy. While these errors don’t tend to be very large for long trips, the closer to "cruise control" you are at the average speed on long segments the closer the estimate will be. Also fill in payload, outside and cabin temperatures and your correct car model – these can make a significant difference. American college education interpreting results

EVTripPlanner has been used to plan over 50,000 routes for thousands of EV drivers. Many drivers report that evtripplanner predictions are very accurate – more than any other tool available. But you can’t count on it being within let’s say, 5%, all the time. You can hit unexpected traffic, weather conditions (especially headwinds) or have to make a last minute detour – so you should always have some margin for safety and a "plan B" for where you would charge for any trip that is estimated to use more than about 80% of the available energy.

• rated miles: this is how tesla reports remaining range (rather than kwh). In order to translate the kwh used by evtripplanner’s model to tesla (or other EV) rated miles, we need to use some conversion factor. Unfortunately, tesla does not publish this number and with recent software releases it may not even be the same all the time. Tesla’s trip meter also doesn’t measure *all* energy used (if you add up energy/miles used plus rated miles remaining, it doesn’t add up to the miles you started with after the last charge). We have made our best estimate, and it seems to correlate pretty well.

We are always interested in your feedback – good and bad, feature requests and defect reports. When providing feedback on route accuracy, please provide your route ID (after the ? In the URL) and information about your drive that might be relevant. Send to comments@evtripplanner.Com

EVTripPlanner is maintained by ben hannel (with a little help from the rest of the family). Ben is 16 now and was 15 when he started working on evtripplanner. He will be applying for college in the fall. Best universities to transfer to if you like and use evtripplanner, consider making a donation to his college fund with the DONATE button.