Read this before starting a low-carb diet sparkpeople germany education level

Danger, danger! Do alarm bells sound in your head at the sight of a carbohydrate-rich food? If eaten, do feelings of guilt and remorse swell up inside? Low-carb, slow-carb, no-carb…with the plethora of diets touting the evils of carbohydrates, it’s no wonder that folks are petrified of potatoes and leery of anything that contains wheat. It’s true that foods that contain carbohydrates are abundant in our society and it is easy to overindulge.

But guess what? Carbs can be your friend. In fact, eliminating them could actually be harmful to your long-term health, and you may be missing out on some of their slimming effects. Here’s the catch, though: You must know which ones to forgo and which to welcome back on your plate.

Not only are carbohydrates found in many foods—fruits, vegetables, beans, dairy products, foods made from grain products, sugar, honey, molasses, corn syrup—but they’re also the body’s ideal fuel for most functions.

They supply the body with the energy needed for the proper functioning of the muscles, brain and central nervous system. In fact, the preferred source of energy for the human brain comes from carbs.

The body converts digestible (non-fiber) carbohydrates into glucose. third level education The glucose then enters the bloodstream. Insulin is secreted from the pancreas, which allows the glucose to enter the body’s cells to be used as fuel. Some glucose is stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles for future use, like fueling a long workout. highest level of education survey If there is extra glucose, the body will store it as fat.

The speed at which carbohydrate foods are digested and utilized by the body, as well as the increase in blood sugar level and insulin production, depends on many factors. These factors include the following: the type and amount of carbohydrate eaten, the amount of fiber contained in the food, other foods that are eaten with the meal or snack, physical activity, stress and certain medical conditions.

Simple carbs, complex carbs and fiber are found in many foods. Some of these foods provide important nutrients that promote health; let’s call these foods "smart carbs." Others, "shoddy carbs," provide calories with little to no nutritional value. Smart Carb Foods:

Examples of calorie-containing sweeteners include white sugar, brown sugar, syrups, honey, and molasses. Sprinkling these added sugars into coffee or using them as a major ingredient in sweet treats and beverages can quickly add unwanted carbs and calories.

When there is a severe deficit of carbohydrates, the body has several immediate reactions, one of which is that it starts using protein as a fuel source. Ketones, a by-product of incomplete fat breakdown, begin to accumulate in the blood. As a result, there is a loss of energy, as well as nausea, headaches, bad breath, dehydration and constipation. hitler’s highest level of education Long term usage can bring about nutrient deficiencies, malnutrition and increased risk for certain diseases such as heart disease, high blood pressure, cancers, diabetes, gout and kidney stones.

There are many "how’s" that need to be explored before you decide if a low-carb diet is for you: How low will your carb intake be? For how low do you plan on sticking to the diet? How will it impact my other medical conditions? How happy will I be? SparkPeople’s goal is to support members on their road to wellness. Our program sets the carbohydrate range to 45 to 65 percent of calories (50 percent for our diabetes program), numbers that are based on the Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intakes for carbohydrate. However, a member can change the carbohydrate range based on recommendations from one’s health care providers, if needed. The Million Dollar Question

How do you get the nutrient-boosting benefits from carbohydrates, while still losing weight? Use the three rules of the "KISS Me Plan": Keep It So Simple for Me for carbohydrate control. what does as level mean in education Rule #1: Know which carbohydrate containing foods are "smart" and which are "shoddy." Rule #2: For accuracy, weigh and measure all carbohydrate-containing foods using standard food portion sizes. Rule #3: Include the correct number of carb-containing food servings in your eating plan.

The bottom line here is that you should be working to cut down on added sugar and refined grains, but should still consider all other carbs fair game. It’s time to let those smart carbs back on your plate as you achieve and maintain a healthier weight. This article was updated by Becky Hand, August 2017.