Student eligibility to receive free or reduced price school meals – kidsdata.org highest education level

• Definition: Number of public school students eligible to receive free or reduced price meals. A child’s family income must fall below 130% of the federal poverty guidelines ($31,005 for a family of four in 2014-2015) to qualify for free meals, or below 185% of the federal poverty guidelines ($44,123 for a family of four in 2014-2015) to qualify for reduced price meals. Percentage of public school students eligible to receive free or reduced price meals. A child’s family income must fall below 130% of the federal poverty guidelines ($31,005 for a family of four in 2014-2015) to qualify for free meals, or below 185% of the federal poverty guidelines ($44,123 for a family of four in 2014-2015) to qualify for reduced price meals.

• Footnote: Years presented are the final year of a school year (e.g., 2014-2015 is shown as 2015).

LNE (Low Number Event) refers to data that have been suppressed because fewer than 20 students were eligible for the program. higher level education N/A means that data are not available.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) defines food insecurity as not having consistent, dependable access to enough food for active, healthy living (1). education level cse Approximately one in five U.S. children live in food-insecure households (2). Food-insecure children are more likely to experience a host of health issues, including developmental, cognitive, behavioral, and mental health problems (3). Among pregnant women, food insecurity is associated with physical and mental health problems, as well as birth complications (3).

Food assistance programs, such as food stamps (i.e., SNAP, or CalFresh in California), the Supplemental Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), and the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs, provide a safety net to help ensure that low-income children, expectant mothers, and families get adequate nutrition. what is your education level These programs have been shown to reduce poverty, improve birth outcomes, and improve children’s health in general (4, 5). Student participation in the National School Breakfast Program also is associated with improved school performance and cognitive functioning (6).

Nearly 59% of all public school students in California are eligible for free or reduced price school meals (meaning their household incomes are less than about $44,000 for a family of four), according to 2015 data. This equates to over 3.5 million low-income students statewide, an increase from about 3.2 million (51%) in 2007. County and school district data show increases, as well; between 2007

and 2015, percentages rose in all but one county and in most school districts with available data. At the county level, the percentage of students eligible for free/reduced price meals ranged from 26% to 80% in 2015. Many more students are eligible for free meals than for reduced price meals. In 2015, over 3 million California students (50% of all students) were eligible for free meals, while over 500,000 (9%) were eligible for reduced price meals.

In 2015, almost 4.5 million Californians participated in the CalFresh supplemental food program, formerly known as Food Stamps. Hispanic/Latino and white households represented the majority of CalFresh participants in 2015, accounting for 75% of the approximately 2.1 million participating households.

According to 2014 estimates, almost 2.1 million California children (23% of the child population) lived in “food insecure” households with uncertain or inadequate access to food, down from nearly 2.5 million (27% of the child population) in 2011.

Food insecurity—a lack of consistent, dependable access to enough food for healthy living—is a major public health problem in California and the U.S., affecting millions of children and families (1, 2). Policymakers can help by supporting efforts to ameliorate poverty, strengthen food assistance programs, and expand access to nutritious, affordable foods in low-income communities (3).

Food and nutrition assistance programs address food insecurity by providing low-income children and families with nutritious and affordable meals. education level professional However, these programs are not used by many who are eligible (4, 5). For example, in California public schools, 30% of the state’s 3.2 million low-income students miss out on free or reduced price school lunch, and 62% miss out on school breakfast (5).

• Utilizing authority under state and federal law to support efforts to make it simpler and less stigmatizing for students to access free and reduced price school meals, while streamlining administration at the school level; for example, encouraging eligible schools to use the Community Eligibility Provision, which allows them to offer free meals to all students (6, 7)

• Adopting school district-wide use of effective models for serving free or reduced price school breakfast, such as serving it during the school day, in class, or outside of traditional settings, to increase participation and decrease stigma associated with subsidized breakfast (7)

• Addressing under-enrollment in other food safety net programs—such as CalFresh (food stamps) and the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)—through outreach to improve public awareness and perceptions of the programs, and by reducing barriers to applying and maintaining enrollment (4)

• Supporting the work of food councils and community groups that are promoting access to sustainable, affordable, and nutritious food sources through such efforts as community and home gardens, farmers markets, urban agriculture, and public education (2, 3)