Why uber and lyft want to take you to the hospital therecord.com university of kansas website

SAN FRANCISCO — it’s no good having health care if you can’t make the appointment. For housebound patients, the answer may increasingly come in the form of an uber or lyft — rather than a medical-transport van or taxi.

Both companies are pushing hard into the health care transportation space in order to add scale to their operations while helping providers improve their level of care.

Hospitals and doctors are flocking to the alternative for the same reason millions of individuals have tapped on an app to call a ride: it’s a cheap, door-to-door option you can track at a glance.

The move is one more way the ride-hailing companies, which rely on fleets of independent contractors, are cutting into established transportation routes and the businesses that have served them, an impact city residents and leaders are only beginning to understand.Uber lyft

Last week, uber health went live after an eight-month trial with 100 health care providers that tested the ride-hailing service as a way to ensure that eligible patients weren’t no-shows for appointments.

Rival lyft on monday built on a two-year effort to offer doctors its platform with a partnership with medical records company allscripts that adds an estimated seven million patients through 2,500 hospitals and 180,000 physicians.

"Obviously helping patients is a good thing, but there are also financial ramifications of making sure your level of care is consistent," says gartner analyst tom handler. "If you get penalized (for not following up with patients), there’s incentive for you to track them better, and sometimes that means helping them get to you."

With both uber and lyft, health care providers use a custom desktop platform that allows them to schedule multiple rides at once.Uber lyft providers determine who is eligible based on need, and costs are covered by providers and sometimes defrayed by insurance.

These new services are limited. Uber and lyft rides to see doctors won’t work for disabled individuals. Last week, disability rights advocates filed a class-action lawsuit against uber, challenging the popular ridesharing service’s lack of transportation for those in wheelchairs.

"Based on our investigation, in most major (U.S.) cities, wheelchair access for uber users is either rare or non-existent," says melissa riess, staff attorney at disability rights advocates. Reiss said uber has not yet responded to the lawsuit. "This is not an unsolvable problem."

The ride-hailing company does offer the option of ordering wheelchair accessible vans, so-called uberwav, through pilot programs in london, toronto, austin and chicago, according to uber’s website.Care providers

Backed by billions in venture capital, uber and lyft have yet to show a profit. Paying the driver, even as a non-employee, eats up much of the ride revenue. As a result, both are trying to eliminate driver costs by creating self-driving car fleets.

But until autonomous cars dawn, the tech startups believe they can improve their bottom line through scale, which is why they’re aggressively pursuing doctors and hospitals as a source of new customers.

Consumers have already showed their willingness to swap uber and lyft for renting or owning cars, taking buses and more specialized staples of transit. A university of kansas survey of ambulance usage rates in 43 states found a seven peer cent decline was explained by a growth in ride hailing.

SAN FRANCISCO — it’s no good having health care if you can’t make the appointment.Care providers for housebound patients, the answer may increasingly come in the form of an uber or lyft — rather than a medical-transport van or taxi.

Both companies are pushing hard into the health care transportation space in order to add scale to their operations while helping providers improve their level of care.

Hospitals and doctors are flocking to the alternative for the same reason millions of individuals have tapped on an app to call a ride: it’s a cheap, door-to-door option you can track at a glance.

The move is one more way the ride-hailing companies, which rely on fleets of independent contractors, are cutting into established transportation routes and the businesses that have served them, an impact city residents and leaders are only beginning to understand.

Last week, uber health went live after an eight-month trial with 100 health care providers that tested the ride-hailing service as a way to ensure that eligible patients weren’t no-shows for appointments.Care providers

Rival lyft on monday built on a two-year effort to offer doctors its platform with a partnership with medical records company allscripts that adds an estimated seven million patients through 2,500 hospitals and 180,000 physicians.

"Obviously helping patients is a good thing, but there are also financial ramifications of making sure your level of care is consistent," says gartner analyst tom handler. "If you get penalized (for not following up with patients), there’s incentive for you to track them better, and sometimes that means helping them get to you."

With both uber and lyft, health care providers use a custom desktop platform that allows them to schedule multiple rides at once. Providers determine who is eligible based on need, and costs are covered by providers and sometimes defrayed by insurance.Uber lyft

These new services are limited. Uber and lyft rides to see doctors won’t work for disabled individuals. Last week, disability rights advocates filed a class-action lawsuit against uber, challenging the popular ridesharing service’s lack of transportation for those in wheelchairs.

"Based on our investigation, in most major (U.S.) cities, wheelchair access for uber users is either rare or non-existent," says melissa riess, staff attorney at disability rights advocates. Reiss said uber has not yet responded to the lawsuit. "This is not an unsolvable problem."

The ride-hailing company does offer the option of ordering wheelchair accessible vans, so-called uberwav, through pilot programs in london, toronto, austin and chicago, according to uber’s website.

Backed by billions in venture capital, uber and lyft have yet to show a profit.Care providers paying the driver, even as a non-employee, eats up much of the ride revenue. As a result, both are trying to eliminate driver costs by creating self-driving car fleets.

But until autonomous cars dawn, the tech startups believe they can improve their bottom line through scale, which is why they’re aggressively pursuing doctors and hospitals as a source of new customers.

Consumers have already showed their willingness to swap uber and lyft for renting or owning cars, taking buses and more specialized staples of transit. A university of kansas survey of ambulance usage rates in 43 states found a seven peer cent decline was explained by a growth in ride hailing.

SAN FRANCISCO — it’s no good having health care if you can’t make the appointment. For housebound patients, the answer may increasingly come in the form of an uber or lyft — rather than a medical-transport van or taxi.Care providers

Both companies are pushing hard into the health care transportation space in order to add scale to their operations while helping providers improve their level of care.

Hospitals and doctors are flocking to the alternative for the same reason millions of individuals have tapped on an app to call a ride: it’s a cheap, door-to-door option you can track at a glance.

The move is one more way the ride-hailing companies, which rely on fleets of independent contractors, are cutting into established transportation routes and the businesses that have served them, an impact city residents and leaders are only beginning to understand.

Last week, uber health went live after an eight-month trial with 100 health care providers that tested the ride-hailing service as a way to ensure that eligible patients weren’t no-shows for appointments.Care providers

Rival lyft on monday built on a two-year effort to offer doctors its platform with a partnership with medical records company allscripts that adds an estimated seven million patients through 2,500 hospitals and 180,000 physicians.

"Obviously helping patients is a good thing, but there are also financial ramifications of making sure your level of care is consistent," says gartner analyst tom handler. "If you get penalized (for not following up with patients), there’s incentive for you to track them better, and sometimes that means helping them get to you."

With both uber and lyft, health care providers use a custom desktop platform that allows them to schedule multiple rides at once. Providers determine who is eligible based on need, and costs are covered by providers and sometimes defrayed by insurance.Care providers

These new services are limited. Uber and lyft rides to see doctors won’t work for disabled individuals. Last week, disability rights advocates filed a class-action lawsuit against uber, challenging the popular ridesharing service’s lack of transportation for those in wheelchairs.

"Based on our investigation, in most major (U.S.) cities, wheelchair access for uber users is either rare or non-existent," says melissa riess, staff attorney at disability rights advocates. Reiss said uber has not yet responded to the lawsuit. "This is not an unsolvable problem."

The ride-hailing company does offer the option of ordering wheelchair accessible vans, so-called uberwav, through pilot programs in london, toronto, austin and chicago, according to uber’s website.

Backed by billions in venture capital, uber and lyft have yet to show a profit.Health care paying the driver, even as a non-employee, eats up much of the ride revenue. As a result, both are trying to eliminate driver costs by creating self-driving car fleets.

But until autonomous cars dawn, the tech startups believe they can improve their bottom line through scale, which is why they’re aggressively pursuing doctors and hospitals as a source of new customers.

Consumers have already showed their willingness to swap uber and lyft for renting or owning cars, taking buses and more specialized staples of transit. A university of kansas survey of ambulance usage rates in 43 states found a seven peer cent decline was explained by a growth in ride hailing.